GALLERY

Architecture and photography:
a crucial relationship.

All too often, a photographer’s work remains as our only record that a building or structure has ever existed. These artists – whether pursuing a passion for their craft or working commercially – have documented significant phases of our built heritage.

In Australia, such photographers have included Harold Cazneaux, Sam Hood, Frank Hurley, Max Dupain and David Moore.

And writing for Architecture Australia, Adrian Boddy observes that a symbiotic relationship often exists between architects and photographers. As he points out, professional photographers need great buildings to publish for a living – while architects depend on great photography to promote their work.

Now and then – bridging the two disciplines – important business and personal relationships have sprung up. For example, between Max Dupain and architect Harry Seidler; and between David Moore and architect Philip Cox.

These galleries feature the work of historical and contemporary photographers.

Photographers

Harold Cazneaux (1878-1953) is remembered for the diversity of his work. Aside from architecture and landscapes, he produced portraits of artists, musicians and actors.
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Greg Davis travels Australia capturing interesting architecture and long-forgotten places. He follows old railway lines which lead him to relics that have weathered countless years.
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Max Dupain (1911–1992) was a pioneer of modernism in Australian photography. He departed from traditional approaches toward a world of contrast and varying angles.
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Neil Fenelon has created montages of three notable architects and their work, namely: Bruce Rickard, Philip Cox and Lionel Glendenning.
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Geoffrey Goddard has a passion for twentieth century architecture. He has published a coffee-table book, Australian Art Deco Hotels.
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Sam Hood
(1872 – 1953)  was a highly successful commercial photographer and photojournalist. He documented the armed services during WWII.
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Michael Miller has held several photographic exhibitions and in 2018 was named Capture magazine’s top emerging art photographer.
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Peter Ogden captures nature and the built environment at The Brutal Beauty. Here, he explores the defensive gun battery built by the Army at West Head during WWII. 
 
Brett Patman founded Lost Collective as a visual and written record of our forgotten built environments. He dwells on how people and places have shaped our communities.
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Peter Sheridan is a renowned collector of Art Deco. He has published several books including Radio Days – Australian Bakelite radios, and Sydney Art Deco.
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